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Telling White Lies

Updated on June 26, 2019

Have you ever told a white lie to be kind, to protect the feelings of others, or maybe to simply avoid stigma? You're not alone.

For some living with a chronic condition, telling a white lie can be a way to save one's strength. Sometimes it's easier not to share your unvarnished truth, especially when it doesn't hurt anyone else.

Have you ever found yourself saying any of the following?

1. "No, no. I can do it myself."
2. "I'm not scared/nervous/anxious/unsure."
3. "I'm fine. Really."
4. "Don't worry. I'm used to this."
5. "No, I'm not in much pain."

Here are some conversations from the community about this topic:

“I want to encourage you to seek mental health support if you struggle with depression, anxiety, or any other mental health-related issue. I know that all of us have a lot in common, and we can be of great support to one another.”

“For anyone who is struggling out there please talk to your doctor about balancing out your pills.”

“I finally told myself I can't live like this my whole life so I better start putting in an effort to enjoy life again. I went back to school, attended therapy, and graduated with a nursing degree.”

Why do you choose a white lie over sharing your true feelings?
What do you wish you could say instead?

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