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Its Hard For Me To Talk About My Epilepsy . Ive Always Been Ashamed Of It . Howw Do You Deal With Emotion Side Of Epilepsy

Its Hard For Me To Talk About My Epilepsy . Ive Always Been Ashamed Of It . Howw Do You Deal With Emotion Side Of Epilepsy

How do you deal with emotional side of epilepsy? And not feeling ASHAMED of having it?

A MyEpilepsyTeam Member said:

What is normal really? If you think about it, it changes with the way society is at the present time. What's considered normal today, could be not so normal weeks; months; a year; or so from now. It's a way of fitting in with society really. If everyone were the same life would be dull. Just a little something to think about, I know life isn't easy with Epilepsy-I grew up with it since I was 8 months old. A little lesson I learned from my Women's Group that I went to, we all have our crosses to bear, but God won't give us more than we can handle.

posted about 7 years ago
A MyEpilepsyTeam Member said:

What I find strange is that less than 1% of the population has AIDS, yet we all know about that. Less than 4% have some other sort of STD, but we all know all about those. However, 11% of the population has epilepsy, yet almost no one who is directly related related to an epileptic knows anything about epilepsy. One in nine people have epilepsy. We all grew up around epileptics and never knew it. Now we hide away ourselves. I say that we should step up and out. Don't be ashamed and don't be afraid. What we should really in the summer is set a day to march on every state capitol to demand more SSDI.

posted over 1 year ago
A MyEpilepsyTeam Member said:

I feel no shame in having an epileptic disorder. I've had two TBI's and that is why I have an epilepsy. I've given talks on TV about my injuries and having epilepsy. I was also a member of an ambulance crew for almost 8 years----I've seen much worse than seizures. One more thing----for the past 15 years, my best friend has been someone who also has the same disorder that I have. All of my childhood friends have stepped up to the plate and stayed by my side, too. There is nothing to be ashamed of----we're a little different. So what? Name two people who are exactly perfect!! You can't. No one is perfect. One more little fact for you to remember---11% of the population has epilepsy.

posted over 1 year ago
A MyEpilepsyTeam Member said:

Having epilepsy (or an epileptic disorder) is NOTHING to be ashamed of. I've had two traumatic brain injuries that gave me epilepsy. I am on social security disability for life. When I do work, it is only part-time. Doctors don't even understand why we have seizures. I know why I have them---scar tissue in the brain. But mine are well-controlled with medication and a VNS. But why do you have them? If you do know, then let others know. That way, if you do go into a seizure, then your friends can decide to call EMS or not. I haven't had a grand mal since 1984, but I do have simple partial seizures (like dizzy spells). But I don't remember them. Keep a notebook of all of your seizures activity---if someone notices you drifting off into space---that's a partial seizure. If someone tells you that you had one, write down the date, time, place, what you were doing when it happened, how long it lasted, and if you took all of your medications either that day or the day before.

posted over 1 year ago
A MyEpilepsyTeam Member said:

I don't know how to deal with epilepsy it been really hard all my life I have mental illness too so I just pray and try to act normal it feels like nobody understands me that's why I always try to hide it

posted over 1 year ago
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